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D'ADDARIO EDUCATION COLLECTIVE

D’Addario Education Collective is a global community of music educators who are committed to inspiring the next generation of lifelong musicians.  Our program provides music teachers with access to digital resources, mentoring from D’Addario’s master educators, exclusive content, promotions, and an opportunity for product feedback and testing. The D.E.C. will grow to include opportunities to network with other teachers, share your knowledge and content, and attend special educational events. 

Key Benefits

Dynamic profile page and brand affiliation with the world’s leading manufacturer of musical instrument accessories and supplies.
Free access to education materials and resources developed by D’Addario and our roster of master teachers, artists and partners.
Monthly eNewsletter packed with helpful information related to your teaching focus (reeds, orchestral, strings, percussion).
Access to D’Addario brand products for evaluation and review.
Exclusive offers and promotions from D’Addario and our educational partners.
Tips from expert music teachers and artists eager to help you elevate your teaching skills.


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Liberty DeVitto

Best known as Billy Joel's longtime drummer, Liberty DeVitto has also appeared as a session drummer on recordings for a variety of other artists. Born on August 8, 1950, in Brooklyn, NY, DeVitto grew up in Seaford, Long Island; and, after catching the Beatles on their infamous Ed Sullivan Show appearance in early 1964, was inspired to play the drums. Entirely self-taught, DeVitto began playing in local bands during high school, before landing gigs with Mitch Ryder and Richie Supa; the latter of whom invited the drummer to play on his obscure 1970 release, Supa's Jamboree. DeVitto was driving the group's equipment van one evening back from a gig when he was involved in a serious accident which left him with injuries that prevented him from playing drums for nearly a year. DeVitto first gig back after his recovery was in a wedding band, which eventually led to the formation of a new group, Topper.

Consisting of DeVitto on drums; Doug Stegmeyer on bass; Russell Javors on guitar and vocals; and Howie Emerson on guitar, slide guitar, and dobro; the group (with the addition of saxophonist Richie Cannata) would become Billy Joel's backing band by the mid-'70s. Subsequently, the drummer backed Joel on a string of classic recordings (1976's Turnstiles, 1977's The Stranger, 1978's 52nd Street, 1980's Glass Houses, 1981's Songs in the Attic, 1982's Nylon Curtain, and 1983's Innocent Man). As a result, DeVitto became a highly sought-after session drummer, playing on such albums as Meat Loaf's Dead Ringer, Carly Simon's Spoiled Girl, Rick Wakeman's Burning, Mick Jones' self-titled solo debut, and sessions for the late Karen Carpenter (which were eventually released on a 1996 self-titled posthumous release), among others. DeVitto continues to tour and record with Joel while the late '90s saw him form a side band, the Funk Club, comprised of members from the Orlando, FL, area.

 

Nate Dobas

A Vic Firth/Remo endorser, Nate brings a wealth of experience to the studio. He is a Former VP of CT Percussive Arts Society and is the Chair of World Drumming Ensemble for Connecticut Music Educators Association. He received his BA in Music Education from Morehead State University in Morehead, KY and holds a Master's in Holistic thinking from the Graduate Institute. He currently holds a position as choral and general music teacher in the Connecticut public school system and has studied privately with John Riley, Terry Lynn Carrington, Dom Famularo, and Fran Merante. He has studied voice with Michelle Lambert and Suzanne Vick.

Always positive and patient, Nate strives to help his students attain their greatest potential and empowers them to find their highest form of creativity. He works with students to develop proper musical technique and builds on that technique so that they can evolve as an artist and an individual. Nate’s school choir has performed in many venues throughout the Tri-State area, including Radio City Music Hall!

Sean Deel

Kenwood Dennard

"A good percussionist starts with a good human being. I learned that from Wayne Shorter, a very influential mentor my entire life. Being a good percussionist technically is to execute the rudiments so you can support the rest of the musicians. From there, you need to be able to realize inner ideas. This is what band leaders have looked for in me, such as Miles Davis, Quincy Jones, and Dizzy Gillespie. That's what they look for in the 'real world.'"

"I teach private students and several drum labs. In one of my favorite labs, we cover unusual rates. I'd like my students to think outside the box, beyond simple 8th notes and 16th notes, and at the same time support the other people in the band. Students who have learned mostly from a videotape or maybe from listening to CDs haven't had much chance to perform with other musicians. Some drummers have difficulty with time and feel—and playing with other musicians—for that reason."

"People say it's not what you know, it's who you know. But I say, don't you think it's how they feel when you're around that's most important? It was Charlie Mingus who showed me the importance of influencing the other members of the band. When I played with Mingus, he made me sound better just by being onstage."

Emil Defusco

Emil Defusco

Vince Di Zazzo

Vince has been an elite teacher for over 30 years. Born in Montreal, Vince began taking lessons locally at the age of 13. By the time he was 15, he was already playing for many local shows and bands. He practiced under different drummers who inspired him and brought on a wide variety of drummingstyles. Vince took lessons under several great teachers including the legendary Pate Magadini. It wasn't long before Vince realized he had a passion for teaching.  Within a few years Vince became one of Montreal's most highly regarded teachers. "To me, teaching is therapeutic and I need to teach as much as my students need to learn! Teaching is not a job, it's a profession and can't be left in the class room when you go home. We need to focus on great teaching, and figure out how we we engage our students during a time when there are more distractions coming in then ever before."